How to Move to the U

How to Move to the U

A YEAR OF CARE PACKAGE PRINTABLES

 

 

All of the supply lists, box decorations, and item tags to make Care Packages for Halloween, 2 Different December Finals, Super Bowl, Valentine's Day, Easter, and Spring Finals. Over 50 of my most popular downloads all together in one place and it's TOTALLY FREE for members of the Almost Empty Nest Community.

The Year of Care Package Printables is part of the Almost Empty Nest Printables Library. Gain access by becoming an Almost Empty Nest Member. If you prefer not to be a member, you may purchase the printables through the same link below.

 

How to Pack for the Move to College

 

It's coming! That day filled with excitement, anxiety, dread, tears, fun, and sweat – that day you finally climb in the car and drive your child to his new temporary home – a college dormitory. You've spent the summer going over the College Dorm Room Checklist and meticulously checked off the items. But before you hit the road, you need some College Packing Tips.

And, don't forget your Parent Survival Kit for College Drop Off!

More College Prep Posts:

7 Summer Musts Before Senior Year

College Checklist for High School Seniors

Back to College: The Essential Guide

Top 5 College Preparation Books

College Packing Tips

 

This post contains affiliate links, which means if you click on a link and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. For more information, see the full disclosure in the foot bar.

 

College Packing Tip #1

Gather these supplies:

  • Banker's boxes (can be purchased in multi-packs at Sams, office supply stores, or online). These are just the right size for small collections of items, are easy to carry (handles), and stack in the car or on a dolly.
  • Depending on your items, a few larger boxes
  • Drawer units, storage boxes, laundry baskets, etc. (Any dorm room item that will hold other items.) You will never be sorry you purchased good, quality drawer units that will last through college and beyond.
  • Mover's stretch plastic wrap
  • a system for labeling
  • trash bags
  • Wheeled duffles or suitcases

 

College Packing Tip # 2:

How to pack your clothes for the move to college

Make a small hole in the middle of the non-open end of several trash bags. Slip the trash bags over clothes on hangers.

Place other clothing in wheeled suitcases or in your drawer units.

 

 

College Packing Tip #3:

Packing school supplies and other small collections of items for the move to college:

Small items and other collections fit perfectly into banker's boxes. These boxes have handles are are very easy to label. They can be collapsed and put back in the car for the drive home or easily stored in a dorm room.

 

College Packing Tip #4:

Packing large and oddly shaped items for the move to college:

Some items will not fit in boxes and will have to be placed in the car “as is.” Wrap anything that might get dirty or has loose parts with plastic stretch wrap. As I was sending a boy to school, he did not have many decorative or other large items.

His loose items consisted of a box with a desk chair, a large white board, an American flag he found left behind by our renters at the rent house we own, and his bedding pack already in a plastic container with a handle.

 

 

College Packing Tip #4:

Label, label, label EVERYTHING for the move to college:

Label every box with your child's dorm name, room number, and name. Hopefully you will be met at the curb by some smiling upper classmen who will empty your car and have everything to the dorm room in less than 10 minutes. However, you want these willing souls to bring your stuff to the correct room!

 

Pile all of your stuff by the door and prepare to load it in the car. 

Using these College Packing Tips for your Move to College will save time and headaches once you arrive at your school. The more you can compact the items into containers that are easily carried and stacked, the better it will fit in your car and the easier it will be to get to the dorm room.

If you are a veteran parent of the college move or have other hints, please share them in the comments, then head over to the Parent Survival Kit for College Drop-Off for tips for the move-in day.

 

 

 

FREE PRINTABLE DORM SHOPPING CHECKLIST

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The Dorm Shopping Checklist is part of the Almost Empty Nest Printables Library. Gain access by becoming an Almost Empty Nest Member. If you prefer not to be a member, you may purchase the printables through the same link below.

More From Almost Empty Nest:

New Apartment Checklist

New Apartment Checklist

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New Apartment Checklist

 

 

It's time to move out of the dorm and get an apartment!!! I have compiled a complete New Apartment Checklist to assist you as you navigate the aisles of IKEA, Bed, Bath, and Beyond, and order online. And best of all, the list is printable!! I have gone through this twice with my sons – one lived in a college town where the apartments were furnished. The other lives where they are not. We bought his furniture from IKEA, Craig's List listings, Amazon, and the Container Store. Subscribe below to access the New Apartment Checklist.

 

Also check out:

Back to College: The Essential Guide

First Apartment Care Package – A kitchen care package with recipes

New Apartment Care Package – A cleaning bucket with supplies and printable cleaning checklist

College Apartment Recipes

Adulting: 7 Expenses to Consider When You Enter the Real World

New Apartment Checklist

 

This post contains affiliate links, which means if you click on a link and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. For more information, see the full disclosure in the foot bar. 

 

Kitchen and Dining

  • Dining Table and Chairs and/or Barstools
  • Skillet
  • Sauce Pan
  • Mulitpot
  • Indoor Grill (My sons have used their indoor grills more than any other appliance. It is an easy and quick way to grill chicken breasts, cook hamburgers, make grilled cheese sandwiches, etc.)
  • Cookbooks like How to Cook Everything: The Basics
  • Crockpot
  • Mixing Bowls
  • Cutting Board
  • Measuring Cups and Spoons
  • Chef's Knife
  • Paring Knife
  • Cooking Utensil Set
  • Can Opener
  • Pot Holders or Mits
  • Cookie Sheet
  • Pizza Pan
  • Silverware
  • Drinking Glasses
  • Mugs
  • Plates
  • Bowls
  • Keurig
  • Toaster
  • Microwave (Check to see if the apartment provides one.)
  • Paper Towel Holder
  • Strainer
  • Dish Soap
  • Dishwasher Detergent
  • Water Bottles
  • Travel Mug
  • Food Storage
  • Trash Can
  • Trash Bags

Living Room (Craig's List and Ikea are great sources)

  • Couch
  • Chairs
  • Coffee Table
  • TV
  • TV Stand
  • Roku/Antena
  • Lamps
  • Rug
  • End Table
  • Shelving

Bedroom (Check the size of the bed if the apartment is furnished. Some are twin XL and some are full-size)

Cleaning Supplies

  • Vacuum
  • Bucket with cleaners and rags or sponges
  • Broom and dustpan
  • Swiffer

 

Storage Ideas

  • Shelving unit
  • Underbed storage
  • Storage Furniture (These Poppin box seats support 275 pounds and can be collapsed when not in use.)
  • Drawer organizers
  • Stacking drawers (I LOVE these modular drawers that can be configured to meet your exact storage needs.)
  • Elfa drawers (These are amazing, come in many sizes, can be customized and will last forever. We have had some of our Elfa units for over 20 years. They will go from your child's dorm room to their first apartment to their first place after graduation and beyond. They are also great for packing in.)

Health and Safety

  • Security System (We bought a Simplisafe for our son. It is wireless and can be put anywhere. We also have it monitored.)
  • The Best First Aid Kit
  • Prescription medications
  • Health Insurance card
  • Small safe (For jewelry, some prescription drugs, laptops, and other electronics that are easily stolen.)
  • Surge protector (Fried electronics are not fun.)
  • Flashlight

To Make the Apartment Comfortable and Personal

 

Other Practical items

 

The first goal of setting up an apartment is to purchase just enough items to make the apartment comfortable and functional, but not more than you need. The New Apartment Checklist. It is available in the Subscriber's Library. Take it with you to the store or use it as you order online.

It can be helpful to have the dimensions of apartment rooms, closets, cabinets, and any furniture provided. If you have this information, take advantage of it, and plan out the room. If not, work with whatever information you have knowing that you can always go to the store or order additional items after you move in.

 

Best wishes as you and your child take on the adventure of a New Apartment.

 

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How to Make the Best First Aid Kit for College

How to Make the Best First Aid Kit for College

How to Make the BEST First Aid Kit for College

 

It's inevitable. Your college kid is going to cut their finger, have a headache, or suffer some sort of GI issue at 2 o'clock in the morning. In their previous life, they ran to the family medicine cabinet for a bandage or medicine. But now what, get up and go to the pharmacy? Or have a well-stocked DIY Dorm First Aid Kit?

What makes this first aid kit the best for college? It is the best first aid kit because it is not so full of gauze and tape that they think they could bandage a severed limb, but has just the right amount of items to manage a small crisis. It is also very compact (a dorm room necessity) and  portable.

Read on for how to make your own.

Interested in what to do if your child has a medical emergency while at college? What to Do if Your College Student has a Medical Emergency

How to Make the Best First Aid Kit for College

 

This post contains affiliate links, which means if you click on a link and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. For more information, see the full disclosure in the foot bar. 

 

There are many commercially-available first aids kits out there, but most of them have the same problem – they are stuffed with a lifetime supply of bandages, but they don't have any of the over-the-counter medicines or other supplies needed for a splinter, headache, small cut, or gastro-intestinal issue. The best first aid kit (especially one for a college dorm room) should have just the amount of supplies needed for a very small crisis and not look like the one used at a camp site 5 miles on foot from help.

Because my kids are high school and college-aged, we know a LOT of high school graduates. I decided to put together these kits for the 19 seniors we gifted this year. It required several trips to different stores and searching online, but I found reasonably-priced and useful items for the kits.

Setting up to make the first batch of first aid kits

Items Needed for the Best First Aid Kit for College:

  • Container for the supplies: I found these containers at Target. They are 11″ x 6 5/8″ x 2 1/4″ and cost $2.99 each.
  • A collection of bandages and supplies for minor injuries. These Featherlite First Aid Kits are available at the Container Store. Each one contains: a first aid book, 2 Acetaminophen (Tylenol) tablets, 2 Antiobiotic ointment packets, 12 antiseptic towelettes, 2 aspirin tablets, 30 bandages in 4 sizes, 2 burn cream packets, 5 butterfly closures, 2 moleskin pads, and 3 sting relief pads. These supplies are enough to treat a minor cut, burn, or insect bite and take up very little room and fit inside the container. An extra kit for the car would be a good idea.
  • A thermometer. It does not have to be a thermometer worthy of their chemistry lab. An easy to use and inexpensive thermometer will help them answer the question, “Do you have fever?” when they call in the middle of the night saying they do not feel well.
  • Tweezers: For splinters
  • Cough Drops: when they can't stop coughing and need to sleep, take an exam, or are driving their roommate crazy.
  • A pain reliever: Acetaminophen and/or Ibuprofen

 

If you are making a kit for your own child, take the Tylenol and thermometer out of the boxes to free up more space. A few items you may consider adding are:

 

Immodium

Hydrocortisone cream

Antiobiotic ointment

Their prescription medications

 

Another item that should be in their possession is their health insurance card. They should keep it in their wallet for convenience or put it in their dorm room safe. The card is replaceable and most insurers have removed social security numbers as member identifiers on the cards, so a wallet is probably the superior location. It will save a lot of hassle at a clinic or pharmacy if it is readily available.

Getting a kiddo ready for college is hard work! Aside from remembering all the usual stuff like bedding and towels, a quality and useful first aid kit is a necessity. What do you think belongs in the Best First Aid Kit for College?

 

FREE PRINTABLE DORM SHOPPING CHECKLIST

The Dorm Shopping Checklist is TOTALLY FREE for members of the Almost Empty Nest Community!

The Dorm Shopping Checklist is part of the Almost Empty Nest Printables Library. Gain access by becoming an Almost Empty Nest Member. If you prefer not to be a member, you may purchase the printables through the same link below.

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crockpot meals for two
College Dorm Room Checklist

College Dorm Room Checklist

FREE PRINTABLE DORM SHOPPING CHECKLIST

The Dorm Shopping Checklist is TOTALLY FREE for members of the Almost Empty Nest Community!

The Dorm Shopping Checklist is part of the Almost Empty Nest Printables Library. Gain access by becoming an Almost Empty Nest Member. If you prefer not to be a member, you may purchase the printables through the same link below.

College Dorm Room Checklist

 

 

Getting ready to move to college can be scary and stressful, but shopping for the dorm room shouldn't be. I have compiled a complete College Dorm Room Checklist to assist you as you navigate the aisles of the super store or order online. Your student most likely won't need or want every item on the list, but the list will help you think about what they should bring. I am shopping right along side you this summer as my son will be a college freshman this fall. And best of all, the list is printable!! Subscribe below the access the list.

 

Also check out:

Back to College: The Essential Guide

10 Dorm Room Items They Will Actually Use

Parent Survival Kit for College Move In

College Dorm Room Checklist

 

This post contains affiliate links, which means if you click on a link and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. For more information, see the full disclosure in the foot bar. 

 

Dorm Room Bed

I have outfitted two boys for college, but am now sending my daughter. Two items I have neglected to put on the list (and are not on the pdf printout) are a headboard and long bedskirt. These really dress up their rooms. Dormify has very stylish options for both of these items as well as bedding and other decor for gals and guys. You can take 20% off your total with the code: SUMMER IS HERE

Dormify's new line is here!

Dorm Bathroom

Cleaning Supplies

 

Food Area

Storage

Health and Safety

  • The Best First Aid Kit
  • Prescription medications
  • Health Insurance card
  • Room safe (For jewelry, some prescription drugs, laptops, and other electronics that are easily stolen.)
  • Computer lock (There is a tremendous amount of “opportunity theft” on college campuses. No fun to walk away from a laptop for a second and turn around and it is gone.)
  • Surge protector (Fried electronics are not any fun either.)
  • Flashlight

To Make the Room Comfortable and Personal

 

Other Practical items

Absolute Must-Haves

 

The first goal of dorm shopping is to purchase just enough items to comfortably set up a dorm room, but not more than you need. The second goal is to purchase just enough storage items to organize the above items, but not more than you need. Print the College Dorm Room Checklist. Take it with you to the store or use it as you order online.

Some college websites give the exact dimensions of dorm rooms, closets, and any other furniture in the room. If you have this information, take advantage of it, and plan out the room. If not, work with whatever information you have knowing that you can always go to the store or order additional items after you arrive.

If you have taken a child to college, share your advice about what to take, what to leave at home, and how to store it all in the comment section below.

FREE PRINTABLE DORM SHOPPING CHECKLIST

The Dorm Shopping Checklist is TOTALLY FREE for members of the Almost Empty Nest Community!

The Dorm Shopping Checklist is part of the Almost Empty Nest Printables Library. Gain access by becoming an Almost Empty Nest Member. If you prefer not to be a member, you may purchase the printables through the same link below.

More from Almost Empty Nest:

crockpot meals for two
7 Summer Musts Before Senior Year

7 Summer Musts Before Senior Year

PLANNING FOR COLLEGE CHECKLISTS

Get your FREE copy of the Planning for College Checklists – Junior Year, Summer Before Senior Year, Senior Year, FAFSA, CSS-Profile, Scholarships, Dorm Shopping, Packing for the Move, and the Parent Survival Kit for College Drop Off

Summer Before Senior Year Checklist

 

Yikes! It’s true. Our third child and the baby of our family will be a senior next fall. It is overwhelming to think of going through the college application process again. I know from our two prior trips through the process that the summer before senior year is valuable time. Using this summer wisely will help eliminate much of the chaos that can occur when all of the deadlines are looming. If you also have a rising high school senior, make sure to check off this Summer Before Senior Year Checklist.

I have created a Printable Summer Before Senior Year checklist. Subscribe below to download this and other college preparation checklists.

 

Summer Before Senior Year Checklist

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  1. Get registered for any of the alphabet tests that your student lacks or wants to retake. (ACT, SAT)
  1. Narrow down the list of colleges to which to apply and schedule any visits for the summer or early fall. Here is a List of 30 Must Ask College Visit Questions.
  1. Familiarize yourself with the Common Application.
  1. For schools that do not accept the Common Application, find out what application they do accept. The school website is the best source for this information.
  1. Urge your student to begin writing their essay. A teacher at my daughter's high school offers a summer essay writing workshop. It is great to dedicate several days to writing the essay with the full focus of a teacher. The fall will be busy and having the essay written and/or having a basic rough draft that can be adapted for any application will be a tremendous stress relief. Common app essay prompts
  1. Contact teachers for recommendation letters. The most popular teachers can become overwhelmed with requests and may limit how many they write. Provide these teachers with a resume of high school accomplishments and activities to assist them in writing the letter.
  1. Spend some time reading college information websites like College Confidential and How to Win Scholarships.

 

The next year will be overwhelming and exciting as your student finishes high school and plans for the future. Taking time this summer to prepare for the journey will alleviate stress and lesson the time crunch in the fall. I have created a printable planning list to help you check off these tasks this summer. This list is a part of the Planning for College Printable pack.

Prepare, plan, dream, and enjoy this summer with your student.

Looking for a complete planner to guide you through college preparation, college search, college applications, and more?

The Planning for College Planner

Also check out: 10 College Application Tips and College Visit Checklist: 30 Must Ask College Visit Questions 

and Mom Tips for Surviving Senior Year from my friend Dana at Parenting in Real Life.

 

 

 

PLANNING FOR COLLEGE CHECKLISTS

Get your FREE copy of the Planning for College Checklists – Junior Year, Summer Before Senior Year, Senior Year, FAFSA, CSS-Profile, Scholarships, Dorm Shopping, Packing for the Move, and the Parent Survival Kit for College Drop Off

More from Almost Empty Nest:

The Scholarship System

The Scholarship System

PLANNING FOR COLLEGE CHECKLISTS

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The Scholarship System Review and Interview

 

Paying for college with scholarships is the dream of many college bound students, but actually winning them requires a plan. I interviewed Jocelyn, who won over $126,000 to completely pay for her college education. She answered  questions and gave us some college scholarship tips including telling me about her Scholarship System. She uses The Scholarship System to coach high school students through the process of researching, applying for, and winning scholarships and has saved families over $720,000 in college costs.

I was also given brief access to the Scholarship System so I could do a full review. 

Check out The Scholarship System and their FREE webinar!

 

The Scholarship System Review and Interview

 

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Tell me a little about yourself and about The Scholarship System

I am the oldest of 5 and my parents told us, “We love you guys, however, unfortunately there is no way we can afford five kids going to college.”

We were like most families, kind of stuck in the middle. We wouldn't just get a free ride to college because of being low income. Yet, my parents did not have enough to cut a check and pay for school. That was my junior year in high school and I was like, oh my gosh, what am I going to do? I don't want to take out debt and I was pretty certain and bullheaded about not taking out debt. So I went on the hunt for scholarships and that is really where it all began.

But the first year was awful. It was so painful. I got sucked into scams. The email that I used back then now has over 20,000 messages and it is all marketing from scam scholarships. And a whole year of what I thought was applying, but in reality I was basically just wasting an entire year because I did not know what I was doing. And then towards the end of my junior year I finally got a $500 scholarship from a small local one. And that's when I realized, “Hey, wait a minute. Maybe these are the kinds of scholarships I should be going after.”

So I started tweaking what kinds of scholarships I was going after, tweaking my essays so that I could get them really fine-tuned, and then slowly, but surely, I got to a free ride. My university only offered me $2000 a year, but yet, I was able to get six figures in scholarships because of going for all of those low hanging fruit, smaller dollar, external scholarships that could still add up to a free ride. In the end I got over $126,000 in scholarships.

 

 

 

What does the ideal scholarship candidate look like?

There are a lot of myths around scholarships where people think that they have to have the perfect GPA, be a National Merit Finalist, (…) or they have to be low income, have to be the next Tim Tebow, and what I found is that wasn't the case. There are scholarships out there for so many different things. It's a matter of finding them.

So, believe it or not, I think a lot of people when they think, “What's the perfect scholarship candidate?” They are going to hear 4.0, perfect SATs, and they are involved in a million things, have a million community service hours, or are captain of the football team, but that is actually not the case because scholarship committees are people just like us, right? And they are looking for someone that is going to succeed, and so really the idea candidate is someone who is going to succeed in college and beyond.

So now, we can say that stats normally indicate that or community service really indicate that, but if we can share the right story to show that whatever we have done actually does prove that we can succeed, then there aren't any really high bars as far as stats and figures, but it's more so character based.

So with students, it's not that they have to fit a certain box. It's that we have to find what it is in your experience that proves that you can take that experience and succeed in college and beyond. We had one student that got scholarships for loving horses. We found 6 scholarships that she could apply to. It's just a matter of finding specific criteria that they are passionate about and going for scholarships that relate to them rather than trying to fit a cookie cutter because there is no cookie cutter student that will win a scholarship. That's the beauty of it. Students like me – my SATs these days would be below average. This is good news for that average student.

 

 

 

What is the number one thing you would tell a student or their parent about applying for scholarships?

The first is to start early and the reason I say that is because a lot of times we can find scholarships, especially local scholarships, that your student will be eligible for way in advance. A lot of times the deadlines are the same year after year. So say, you start researching in your sophomore or junior year… You can compile a list of all the scholarships that our student can apply to and start prepping for it.

Seniors are so caught up in admissions that they miss out on a lot of money. But if we can start doing that research a head of time, then they just have to focus on the applications, not the research and finding them and potentially missing deadlines. So I highly recommend starting early and documenting and even if the deadline has passed, so they can apply the following year. Start creating a list.

 

 

Are scholarships more competitive than they used to be because there are more and more kids applying for scholarships as people have become more aware of them?

You would think that was the case with debt increasing, with headlines all over the place about the scary student debt situation, you would think students would start applying. Unfortunately, a lot of students think they are going to apply and they don't. They start the process and they get overwhelmed and they quit. That is why, in my opinion, The Scholarship System has been so successful so far. It gives them clear steps to follow.

When you say to your kid, “You need to get scholarships because we can't afford this,” they are going to google “scholarships” and come back with 90,000 pages of scholarships that don't pertain to them, scams, and they are just going to get overwhelmed. With a clear system to follow, breaking it down into bite-sized chunks, it increases the chances that they are going to actually apply in the first place. So even though students know they need to be applying for scholarships, I don't think that a lot of them really are doing it because they get so overwhelmed with all of the junk out there. To go off that – someone recently contacted us. It was a $1000 scholarship with a little essay and it had zero applicants. He said, “I have a million blog readers a month and I have zero applicants.”

 

 

What is your advice for the kid who is so busy being awesome – good grades, officer in clubs, athletics, community service, that they have no time to apply for scholarships?

We talk about in our facebook group a concept called “Scholarship Saturdays” or “Scholarship Sundays.” I highly recommend families setting aside a time where “this is scholarship time.” There is no arguing about it. You only need an hour or two. We will sit down and start researching scholarships for you and you start doing the applications. The families that have done that, I see the most success with.

The challenge when we say, “Did you apply?” “Did you apply?” “Did you apply?” it just sounds like nagging. Instead when we have that Scholarship Saturday or Sunday, we don't have to nag them Monday through Friday because we know our dedicate time.

The other thing to keep in mind is that you have to do admission essays and a lot of that can be reused. Once you get some solid application materials ready, you can reuse them over and over and over like I did. That is when you really start cutting down the time it takes. It does take some time to get started which is  why I recommend choosing a consistent time for the family to get together. Bake cookies, whatever… But once you get going, it get's easier because you can reuse stuff.

 

What can a parent ethically do to help their child with their applications?

I love this question! One thing we talk about a LOT is DO NOT DO THEM FOR YOUR STUDENT! In the course, we have an interview with a scholarship committee member who has given out a half a million dollars every year for a long time. He says when a parent does the application, they can tell. They see it all the time and those students are automatically disqualified.

Even though you cannot do it for them, there are areas where a parent can be involved. First, researching them, so finding scholarships they can apply to. I have parents who do the research and print them out – just stack them in a folder and their student goes through them.

Also some parents who have the experience can proofread essays. I only recommend that for parents who are confident in their writing skills and we have to be honest with ourselves about whether we are the right person. Most of the time an English teacher or English professor would be better, but parents can help with that.

Sitting down and brainstorm with your student about what they can talk about. A lot of times parents find it easier to toot their kids horn than they do. Parents can remind the student of an achievement they have that actually is impressive.

 

I understand that you now have an App. Is that just available to The Scholarship System members or is it available to everyone?

Yes! Earlier I said you can start building your list now. You can do that right in the app and the app will actually send an alert two weeks before the deadline that you put in there. We tell our students that if you find a scholarship, but you have missed the deadline and will still be eligible next year, you can save it in the app and set the deadline a month out. It automatically populates the link, the dollar amount, the due date.

Start building your own personal data base. People log in and say, “It's empty.” That is the point. We purposely left it empty so that you can create your own personal data base of scholarships. The only scholarships that will be in there will be the ones that you personally added.

The App is completely free to anyone.

 

Anything that you would like to add?

With the course we have had a lot of success. A mother recently emailed me and her daughter got over $90,000 and she said that The Scholarship System was the best investment they have ever made for her education. It's so rewarding to see these families that now can completely avoid debt or having to borrow way less. This student was able to go to a school that was not even on the table unless she got scholarships. So that is what we offer the opportunity for: to completely eliminate or debt or at the very least reducing it if they just got $5000 a year, which is $20,000 over 4 years.

 

I thoroughly enjoyed interviewing Jocelyn. She is upbeat and fun. I was also allowed to review The Scholarship System. It is chock full of information, tips, worksheets, and timetables. It is a complete guide to winning scholarships. The Scholarship System also includes access to a private facebook group where you can interact with Jocelyn, her employees, and other families for even more help winning scholarships. She offers a FREE Webinar where she shares some of her most important college scholarship tips. 

For more information about paying for college check out The Complete Guide to Paying for College.

 

PLANNING FOR COLLEGE CHECKLISTS

Get your FREE copy of the Planning for College Checklists - Junior Year, Summer Before Senior Year, Senior Year, FAFSA, CSS-Profile, Scholarships, Dorm Shopping, Packing for the Move, and the Parent Survival Kit for College Drop Off

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