fbpx
Best Books on Parenting Adult Children

Best Books on Parenting Adult Children

 

Best Books on Parenting Adult Children

 

Are you looking for a book on parenting adult children? I think many people are, but the problem is that so few have been written. I have read many books on empty nesting, but only 3 solely dedicated to Parenting Adult Children. While I am sorry I can’t give you a long list of the best books on parenting adult children, I will share with you what I have found.

For more information about parenting adult children:

Parenting Adult Children

10 Best Books about Empty Nesting: Many of these books have sections about adult children

5 Ways to Find Purpose as an Empty Nester

 

best books on parenting adult children

Best Books On Parenting Adult Children

 

This post contains affiliate links, which means if you click on a link and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. For more information, see the full disclosure in the foot bar.  

“Empty Nest, Full Life” by Jill Savage

This book is about empty nesting, but the entire first section deals with our adult children.

This book is the deepest, most vulnerable, and raw of all of the books I read. The first half of the book concerns relationships with adult children. Jill has truly struggled and come out the other side including loving her homosexual son and his friends and dealing with mental illness in another son. Her insight into what drives us as parents to try to control our adult children and beat ourselves up if they do not “turn out” like we would have wanted is unmatched in any of the other books I read.

A quote:

“… I’d made my children’s behavior an idol. I was using them to define myself. In order to have a healthy relationship with my kids, I had to let go of my idols.”

 

“Doing Life with Your Adult Children” by Jim Burns

Best Quote in the Book: 

“No parent wants to see a child end up homeless, make unwise decisions, or lead a negative lifestyle. But this is where parents must face their fears and decide what is best for their child in the long run.”

“Doing Life with your Adult Children” is a practical guide to having good relationships with your grown children. He covers topics such as when to insert your opinion, avoiding entitlement, in-laws, and stepfamilies, grandchildren, and financial planning (including estate planning) with your kids.

best books on parenting adult children

“Praying the Scriptures for your Adult Children” by Jodie Berndt

Best Quote in the Book: 

“God doesn’t want us to trust in an outcome, he wants us to trust in him.” This quote comes from the Epilogue of the book, but it is a great summary for the book.

“Praying the Scriptures for Your Adult Children”  is as much about praying over ourselves as it is praying for our children. One of the biggest struggles we moms face as our children grow up is letting them go and giving them and their decisions to the Lord.

best books on parenting adult children

“How to Really Love Your Adult Child” by Gary Chapman  and Ross Campbell, MD

 

At first I was not too sure about this book. It starts with a long dialogue about our culture and its affects on our kids. While culture is always a factor in all of our lives, I don’t find it helpful to wring our hands over it and give up. As I moved into the chapters the advice became much more practical and helpful.

Ross Campbell is a psychiatrist specializing in children and family issues. Gary Chapman is a minister and counselor. I appreciate the expertise of a physician especially when dealing with depression, ADHD, and other issues in our children.

Unfortunately that’s all there is folks in my list of Best Books on Parenting Adult Children. I reviewed one more book. It was written in 2008 and seemed out of date. The author was talking about being pregnant in 1965! Her child is older than I am, so I did not include it. 

 

What is Your

Empty Nest Super Power?

How to Own Your Nest, Live your Passion, and Love your Life!

 

More from Almost Empty Nest:

crockpot meals for two
Small Coffee Bar Ideas

Small Coffee Bar Ideas

Small Coffee Bar Ideas on a Budget

Looking to create a small coffee bar? Here are some small coffee bar ideas that you can create on a budget.

For more apartment ideas:

College Apartment Kitchen Idea

New Apartment Checklist

New Apartment Care Package

College Apartment Recipes

small coffee bar ideas

Small Coffee Bar Ideas on a Budget

This post contains affiliate links, which means if you click on a link and make a purchase, I may receive a small commission. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

 

THE PROBLEM

One of the problems with an apartment is a small kitchen with a small amount of counter space. This picture shows my daughter’s apartment kitchen counters on move in day – not much there!

small coffee bar ideas

So what is a little apartment kitchen with no counter space to do? Add some with a bar cart. You can use a bar cart for a lot of things – for drinks, to serve food to a gathering, or as a coffee bar. These girls start their days with coffee so we chose to make a small coffee bar.

And if you are in college or just starting out, you need small coffee bar ideas on a budget!

FIRST THINGS FIRST

The first step to creating a small coffee bar on a budget is to find a reasonably priced bar cart. Many affordable carts in all finishes are available on websites like Amazon and Zulily. This iDesign bar cart cart came from Zulily.

idesign bar cart

ASSEMBLE THE CART

A budget bar cart will come in a box and will need to be put together. Don’t let that scare you. Assembling a bar cart is super simple. My daughter and I were able to easily put it together  in about 15 minutes. The only tool we needed was a phillips head screwdriver. I even forgot to take my Covid mask off. (I was wearing it because the other girls and some of their parents were in the apartment.)

college apartment kitchen ideas

One of the best things about a bar cart is that they almost always have casters. Being able to move the cart around is handy in a small space if you want to rearrange.

coffee bar

SMALL COFFEE BAR IDEAS

Your coffee bar will need several items:

The first is a coffee maker. A Keurig is easy to use and the pods are inexpensive compared to other types of single serve coffee makers. You can save money by buying refillable pods and putting your own ground coffee in the pods. If you use refillable pods, I recommend filters. I make a pot of coffee every morning in my Keurig caraffe. Using filters in the refillable pods is the only way to go to avoid the mess of cleaning the pod all the time.

A fun addition to the coffee bar are coffee flavoring syrups. Don’t forget to get the pumps as well.

Add a plant or other decorations to add personality to your cart.

We added a mug tree. The gold looks modern and sets off nicely against the black cart. The gold mug tree came from Amazon.

You need mugs for your coffee and you cannot go wrong with white mugs. They also set off well against the black cart. The white mugs came from Target. Here is a similar white mug set from Amazon.

coffee bar

If you have room, you can add water bottles or a container for your coffee pods. These green Perrier water bottles add more personality and color to this small coffee bar.

college apartment kitchen ideas

DOESN’T IT LOOK AMAZING!

This small coffee bar is so cute. What fun to grab coffee from this coffee bar every morning on their way to class. (Or to their desks in their rooms. It is 2020 after all.) You can use these small coffee bar ideas to make a coffee bar of your own.

Join the Community

Join the Almost Empty Nest Community and receive FREE ACCESS to the Almost Empty Nest Printables Library. The Printables Library includes every printable on Almost Empty Nest - A Year of Care Package Printables, Gift Tags, College Preparation Checklists, Additional Care Package Printables (Birthday, March Madness, the Super Bowl, additional Halloween and finals), Bible Verse printables and more.

 

 

If your prefer not to join, you may purchase the printables HERE.

More from Almost Empty Nest:

first apartment ideas
7 new apartment expenses
new apartment checklist
College Apartment Kitchen Ideas

College Apartment Kitchen Ideas

College Apartment Kitchen Ideas 

 

My daughter and her friends moved into their first college apartment last week. I was overjoyed to help them with some college apartment kitchen ideas. We worked to set up and organize their pantry and their refrigerator. We also styled a bar cart as an adorable coffee bar.

You can find all of the details, cool things for a college apartment, and the steps we took to organize their college apartment kitchen.

 

For more college apartment ideas:

New Apartment Checklist

New Apartment Care Package

College Apartment Recipes

college apartment kitchen ideas

College Apartment Kitchen Ideas

This post is sponsored by Zulily. All opinions are my own. For more information see my disclosure page.

 

COLLEGE APARTMENT KITCHEN IDEAS TO ORGANIZE YOUR REFRIGERATOR

A shared refrigerator can turn into a big jumbled mess pretty quickly, so we worked to give each girl a spot to store their food. We started with 4 – 8″ Fridge Binz Caddies from Zulily – one for each girl. I made labels for each bin with their names. It is nice for each person to have their own space in the refrigerator in a shared college apartment kitchen.

college apartment kitchen
The girls selected mostly grab and go items like cuties, yogurt, and individual snacks as well other refrigerated foods they wanted to have at home.
college apartment kitchen

Their refrigerator is organized and super functional thanks to these bins from Zulily.

college apartment kitchen
COLLEGE APARTMENT KITCHEN IDEAS FOR THE PANTRY

They decided they wanted to organize the pantry by category. We used food storage bins from Zulily. I made labels for categories like pasta, breakfast, baking, and snacks.

college apartment kitchen
college apartment kitchen
college apartment kitchen
Organizing their pantry from the beginning will keep them from having to conduct a major cleanout later. The bins give them a place for each type of food and they will be able to put groceries away right into their proper spot.
college apartment kitchen
We had an extra bin and decided to use it for cleaning supplies under the sink.
COLLEGE APARTMENT KITCHEN IDEAS: HOW TO MAKE A COFFEE BAR

College apartments often have very little counter space. A bar cart is the perfect solution. It can be added to the living area of the apartment and set up as a coffee bar.

idesign bar cart
This iDesign bar cart from Zulily was easy to transport from home in its box. My daughter and I were able to easily assemble it in about 15 minutes.
college apartment kitchen ideas
The casters on the bottom are a great addition. They will be able to move the cart around anytime they wish.
coffee bar

We had the best time styling the cart with their coffee maker, syrups, Perrier, and some mugs.

coffee bar
college apartment kitchen ideas
By the end of the day four college students with the help of their parents had moved into the apartment. They are all set to go for the year with these college apartment kitchen ideas and items from Zulily.
college apartment kitchen ideas

Join the Community

Join the Almost Empty Nest Community and receive FREE ACCESS to the Almost Empty Nest Printables Library. The Printables Library includes every printable on Almost Empty Nest - A Year of Care Package Printables, Gift Tags, College Preparation Checklists, Additional Care Package Printables (Birthday, March Madness, the Super Bowl, additional Halloween and finals), Bible Verse printables and more.

 

 

If your prefer not to join, you may purchase the printables HERE.

More from Almost Empty Nest:

crockpot meals for two
The Best Back to School Tips for Teens and Parents

The Best Back to School Tips for Teens and Parents

The Best Back to School Tips for Teens and Parents

 

Can you believe it is already time to get ready to go Back to School? Even though the 2020-2021 school year is still not certain for many teens and parents all over the country, it is time to prepare for something… Kids will need to set up to learn whether that is online, in their schools, or a combination or the two.

If they are headed into their junior year of high school, it is time to get serious about what they are going to do after high school, especially if they are college-bound.

To help you as you prepare for the new school year, I have gotten together with some of my fellow bloggers and prepared the Best Back to School Tips for Teens and Parents. 

back to school tips for teens and parents

The Best Back to School Tips for Teens and Parents

 

The best teen and college preparation bloggers around have written posts to help you get organized, get school supplies, and start preparing those high school kids for college.

 

GETTING ORGANIZED TO GO BACK TO SCHOOL

Going back to school can be super stressful for both teens and their parents. Nancy from Raising Teens Today gives 5 Tips to Conquer Back to School Stress.

Louisa, a teacher, tutor, mom, and owner of LPTutoring knows what school supplies are really needed and how to get good deals on them. She shares Back to School Shopping for Teens.

Ready to get help your ADHD (or any) teen get organized? Dana E. Baker of Parenting in Real Life knows what it takes. Read Help Your Child Get and Stay Organized for School.

Here are 5 Amazing Organizational Apps for Teens from Kira of Parenting Teens and Tweens.

 

MIDDLE SCHOOL AND HIGH SCHOOL PARENTING

Miranda of Reluctant Cowgirl has a free downloadable Parent-Child School Contract in her post 10 Steps to Help Your Teenager Succeed in School.

Dana Baker is a parent and teen coach. She has several posts about teen parenting including Six Ways to Survive Being 24/7 with Your Teen,  8 Life Skills Your Teen Needs Now, Help Your Teen Be More Likeable, Not Popular, and Mom Tips for Surviving the High School Senior Year .

Speaking of that senior year…. There are many costs associated with having a senior. Check out my post High School Senior Year Costs with suggestions for both high and low options for paying for the year.

Melanie of Parenting High Schoolers knows that navigating high school with your child can be like riding a roller coaster. She has a FREE Parent Survival Kit just for the high school moms. Check out her High School Survival Kit for Parents and The Ultimate List of Conversations to Help Your Teen through High School.

Melanie also has tips for Middle School Parents in Middle School: Advice for Success

Anxiety in teens is a real problem. Shannon of Skip to My Life gives tips for Helping Your Gen Z Child with Anxiety.

Also check out these Best Homework Apps to Help Your Child Succeed from Sunshine and Hurricanes

COLLEGE AND CAREER PREPARATION

One of the challenges of high school is that college is not far behind. Monica of How2winscholarships knows that the sooner you begin applying for scholarships, the more your child will win. Read her tips in How to Start the College Scholarship Process.

Teens and parents have more than just high school on their minds. They also have to plan for their futures after high school. Miranda of The Reluctant Cowgirl has an awesome post with 3 Tips to Motivating Teens to Apply for College and for Scholarships

Be sure to download the Almost Empty Nest Planning for College Checklists which include Junior Year, Summer Before Senior Year and Senior Year of High School Checklists.

Loren Kelly is a career coach. She assists students with career planning, academic success, and work-based learning experiences such as internships and apprenticeships. Check out her post High School Seniors: Career Planning Tips.

 

Blessings to you all as you begin getting ready for your teens to go back to school and follow the best back to school tips for teens and parents.

PLANNING FOR COLLEGE CHECKLISTS

Get your FREE copy of the Planning for College Checklists - Junior Year, Summer Before Senior Year, Senior Year, FAFSA, CSS-Profile, Scholarships, Dorm Shopping, Packing for the Move, and the Parent Survival Kit for College Drop Off and the Glossary of College Admissions Terms.

More from Almost Empty Nest:

crockpot meals for two
Parent Survival Kit for College Drop Off

Parent Survival Kit for College Drop Off

FREE PRINTABLE DORM SHOPPING CHECKLIST

The Dorm Shopping Checklist is TOTALLY FREE for members of the Almost Empty Nest Community!

The Dorm Shopping Checklist is part of the Almost Empty Nest Printables Library. Gain access by becoming an Almost Empty Nest Member. 

Parent Survival Kit for College Move In

 

You have known this day was coming for several months. You have shopped for all the dorm necessities on the College Dorm Room Check List, have them packed up (How to Move to the U), and everything is in the front hall ready to go in the car. But, what else do you need to ensure a smooth move-in day? There are a few “don’t forget” items you need to include in your Parent Survival Kit for College Drop Off.

Also Check Out:

College Dorm Room Checklist

25 Dorm Room Ideas and Shopping Tips

 

college move in

PARENT SURVIVAL KIT FOR COLLEGE DROP OFF

This post contains affiliate links. If you click on a link and make a purchase, I will receive (at no additional cost to you) a small commission, which helps pay for this blog. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

 

Whether you are approaching college drop-off with dread or excitement or a combination of both, you want the day to go as smoothly as possible. There is the potential for crowded hallways and staircases (forget the elevator), no or very little air conditioning, and a high emotional level from every person you bump into in these crowded hallways. Being prepared will keep you from bursting into tears as soon as you walk into your child’s very small room that is already full of her roommate’s stuff and her roommate’s five family members.

 

SUCCESSFUL COLLEGE MOVE IN DAY TIPS:

 

FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS FROM THE SCHOOL

Plan to arrive at the time you have been assigned. Don’t try to beat the system. They have assigned the times for a reason and they will not want to check you in early. If you manage to beat the system and get moved in early, it will cause resentment from your child’s roommate who arrives to find the room already set up without his input.

BRING A PARENT SURVIVAL KIT FOR COLLEGE DROP OFF:

college move in

THE ITEMS TO INCLUDE IN YOUR PARENT SURVIVAL KIT FOR COLLEGE DROP OFF

 

A dollie or wagon. Hopefully, happy and enthusiastic upper classmen will meet you at the curb and take everything to the room for you. If this does not happen, you will be prepared to stack things in your wagon and make quick work of moving the stuff to the room.

We originally bought this wagon for our daughter’s track meets. It was awesome! It folds up flat, has drink holders, and all-terrain wheels. It is a life saver almost anywhere.

MORE ITEMS TO INCLUDE IN YOUR PARENT SURVIVAL KIT FOR COLLEGE MOVE IN

A wheeled ice chest with some cold drinks and snacks.

A door stop to prop the dorm door open while moving in or to keep the room from being too stuffy.

A few tools (electric screwdriver/drill, rubber mallet, hammer) for assembling shelves and drawer units.

Pen and Paper to make a list of items to go buy once you arrive.

Tape Measure. If you need to go buy shelves or drawer units, it will help to know the space available.

Alcohol Swabs and a blow dryer: These seem like strange items, but they will make hanging Command Strips so much easier. Getting the wall clean and dry before adhering the strips will make them stick better.

Kleenex (a few for your pocket and a box for the car).

Multi-purpose cleaner and paper towels to clean spots in the room or furniture that were missed by the last occupant.

 

A FEW MORE COLLEGE MOVE IN DAY TIPS

Expect chaos and be ready to be patient and malleable to the situation.

Don’t plan to give advice to your child about room setup or anything else. This is not the time. It is their room and they need the freedom to decide where the bed goes, what drawer they want their underwear in, and whether they want you to unpack everything.

Take pictures of any existing damage to walls, floors, doors, and furniture in case it is an issue at move-out.

Plan a shopping trip. After you arrive and get the basic unpacking done, take a survey of the room and make a list of items to go buy. These may be items that were too big to bring with you or just some snacks and laundry detergent. A shopping trip gets you out of the dorm for a while and lets you and your child pick out a few last things together.

Find a place other than the dorm for your good-byes – some place calmer and more private. Take your child out to dinner or for ice cream as your last activity and say good bye there.

 

While it may be hard to believe, you both will survive the drop-off experience. Planning ahead and bringing a Parent Survival Kit for College Move In will certainly help. You cannot anticipate everything the day will entail, but having a few items at your fingertips will keep the panic at bay. When it is time to get in the car and drive away, smile through the tears and congratulate yourself on raising a spectacular kid who is ready for the adventures and experiences ahead.

See 25 Dorm Room Ideas and Shopping Tips for ideas about how to set up the room and what to bring.

Join the Community

Join the Almost Empty Nest Community and receive FREE ACCESS to the Almost Empty Nest Printables Library. The Printables Library includes every printable on Almost Empty Nest - A Year of Care Package Printables, Gift Tags, College Preparation Checklists, Additional Care Package Printables (Birthday, March Madness, the Super Bowl, additional Halloween and finals), Bible Verse printables and more.

 

 

If your prefer not to join, you may purchase the printables HERE.

More from Almost Empty Nest:

crockpot meals for two
What to do if your College Student has a Medical Emergency

What to do if your College Student has a Medical Emergency

What to do if your College Student has a Medical Emergency

 

It’s a parent’s worst nightmare. A call from your child (or worse, a call from someone else) explaining symptoms or injury requiring immediate medical attention. Preparing ahead of time and having a few things at your fingertips  (like a HIPAA authorization form) will help you stay calm if your College Student has a Medical Emergency.

We received this kind of phone call from our son 3 years ago. It was 3:30 in the morning and he had awakened with shaking chills, fever, and terrible lower abdominal pain. Less than an hour later he had been diagnosed with an appendicitis and my husband was on the road for the six hour drive to be with him.

What to Do if Your College Student has a Medical Emergency

Disclaimer: I am not an attorney, physician, or college official. Please do not consider this post as medical or legal advice or as an explanation of any school’s policies. Please contact the appropriate people for further clarification. 

 

Here are some steps to preparing for and handling, in the moment, a medical emergency involving your child who does not live near you:

 

Before your College Student has a Medical Emergency:

Make sure they have their health insurance card in an easily accessible place.

Either call your health insurer or carefully read the materials from your health insurer concerning seeking care in another city/state. Find out if there are “in-network” health care providers and facilities in the new college town. Our son is in another state, so fortunately, our health insurer allows us to seek emergency care anywhere and it will be classified as “in network” for the deductible and out-of-pocket portions of the bill. If there are “in-network” facilities where your child lives and your student goes somewhere else, you could be in for a large bill.

Consider executing a HIPAA release and a medical power of attorney with your child. Once your child is 18, you will need YOUR CHILD’S PERMISSION to access their medical information.  Hospitals and doctors are not allowed to discuss your child’s medical care with you without signed consent. I recently interviewed a physician about HIPAA forms and here is his take:

Every institution will prefer their own forms for HIPAA purposes, but it is a good idea for the person who will be making the decisions and/or paying the bill to have an executed HIPAA form on file to fax or e-mail if the medical provider/institution will not give you adequate information, especially over the phone. If the patient is unconscious, the provider will talk to the next of kin, but that can sometimes be difficult to determine. Divorces and other family situations can complicate “the next of kin” issue.

Tell your child to put you as the emergency contact and as a person with whom health care providers may share medical information when filling out ANY AND ALL medical forms.

Have your child fill our whatever forms they need to with the insurer before they go to college, so that you can discuss their bills with the insurer. Even though you are the “insured” and are paying the bills, an insurer is also not allowed to discuss their bills with you without their consent. This was a bit of an issue with us because our son needed to give notice within 24 hours of his emergency to get in network benefits. We ultimately got it straightened out and were given the correct benefits, but did have to argue a bit that we tried several times to call them. They were arguing that the notice had to be from our son!

Discuss with your child what campus clinics, urgent cares, free-standing ERs, and hospitals are available. Do you have an opinion about where they seek care?

If possible, select a local friend or family member, who can act as the emergency contact until you arrive.

 

 

Understand what a HIPAA and Medical Power Of Attorney Do and Do Not Do:

I have seen post after post and thread after thread with misunderstandings about HIPAA forms and Medical Powers of Attorney. These documents WILL NOT get you a call from a medical institution, the student’s dorm, or anyone else if your student is ill or seeks care. These forms will get you information WHEN YOU ASK FOR INFORMATION. 

There is not a place for you to file these forms on campus. You keep them with you and produce them should you ever need them to access information about your student.

A Medical Power of Attorney only goes into effect if the student is incapaciated and unable to make medical decisions for themselves.

As an adult, your student may also revoke your access to their medical information anytime they wish.

Remember: the student you send to college is just as much an adult in the eyes of the law as you are. It may seem crazy, but that is the way it is.

 

Communication with your student is everything

Discuss these issues with them before they go to school. Make sure they understand how limited your information will be without their cooperation. We have the kind of kids who call with every hangnail, but I have heard stories of kids who really want to adult and try to handle situations on their own that they really need help with.

Ask them to put you as the emergency contact on all of their forms, so if someone is looking for someone to call, they can contact  you.

Ask them if it would be ok for their roommate or other friend to call you if they are taken to the hospital or the friend judges it to be an emergency.

Assure them that whatever the issue is, they are not going to be in trouble for making you a part of a medical emergency even if the circumstances that led to the medical emergency are not something you would normally be happy about.

Try not to be too panicky or overly controlling when discussing these issues with your student. Most kids do not want surgery or serious testing without the support of their parents, but they may start to desire some privacy about mental health and other sensitive issues. Tell them that you trust them to call you when they need help.

What to do when you receive “the call”:

Determine what action your child should take when they call with “symptoms.” After 18 years, you are probably pretty good at interpreting your child’s voice and level of drama. Some kids will call hysterical because they have a splinter. Others will call and say, “I decided to jump off my raised bed and I fell on my arm. My arm is now a weird shape. Do you think I should show it to the pre-med student down the hall or do you think it is nothing?” (If it is just a splinter, send them to the first aid kit from The Best First Aid Kit for College.)

If you decide they should seek medical attention, remind them to take their insurance card with them and to PUT YOU AS THE EMERGENCY CONTACT and person to whom the doctor may give medical information.

Boys do not like to ask for help even if they are in incredible pain. But, depending on the situation, encourage your child to have a friend drive them. Our son drove himself to a free standing ER. The free standing ER made him call a friend to take him to the hospital. We are extremely grateful for the young man who came to his side at 4:00am.

The next step is the toughest: wait by the phone for your child or a doctor to call with news of what is wrong and what the next steps will be.

Find your HIPAA form in case you need it.

If you have a local friend or family member who can stay with your child until you get there, call them.

Plane, train, or automobile it to your child’s side.

Another mom’s experience (What if my child is unconscious?):

I recently interviewed my friend Rexann, who received this kind of call from an ER doctor. Her son played baseball for his college and had collapsed during a workout. He spent over a month in the ICU after a heatstroke and experiencing the breakdown of his muscles from a condition called rhabdomyolysis. He has since recovered thanks to the excellent care he received and the prayers of family, friends, and strangers far and near.

Rexann says they did not have an executed HIPAA document, but had no trouble receiving information from the doctors at the hospital even over the phone. The drive to the hospital was about 8 hours and she received information even on the way.

She had the same experience we did with her insurance company. They said they did not have permission to talk to her about her son because he was over 18. After repeatedly explaining to them that he was unconscious, they finally relented and talked to her about the financial side of things.

I also asked her if she had any advice for parents who find themselves in this situation. She said that there is no way to really prepare for the moment you receive that kind of call. As a sports mom she had dealt with many injuries and issues over the years and was not initially concerned to hear from an ER. Her only advice was to  stay calm because you will receive better information and the hospital staff will respond better to a calm person. 

Knowing What to do if your College Student has a Medical Emergency is a necessary part of the college preparation process. Neither you nor your student wants to be in this situation, but sometimes it is unavoidable. Take the necessary steps to be prepared.

 

Join the Community

Join the Almost Empty Nest Community and receive FREE ACCESS to the Almost Empty Nest Printables Library. The Printables Library includes every printable on Almost Empty Nest - A Year of Care Package Printables, Gift Tags, College Preparation Checklists, Additional Care Package Printables (Birthday, March Madness, the Super Bowl, additional Halloween and finals), Bible Verse printables and more.

 

 

If your prefer not to join, you may purchase the printables HERE.

More from Almost Empty Nest:

crockpot meals for two
Take the "Which Planner Should I Choose?" QuizHere
Skimlinks Test