Do You Need a Driving Contract with your Teen?

Do You Need a Driving Contract with your Teen?

Do Parents Need A Teen Driving Contract?

 

Prior to our first son turning 16, our insurance company sent us a driving contract for us to execute with him before we let him loose on the streets. It had not occurred to us to have a contract with our son covering our expectations of him in order to have the privilege of driving. The more my husband and I read the contract and thought about this new privilege, the more we were convinced we did need to make a written contract with him. What do you think? Do Parents Need A Teen Driving Contract ?

Do Parents Need a Teen Driving Contract?

 

We decided we did need teen driving contracts. These are the reasons.

 

·      Driving is a potentially dangerous activity with adult responsibilities and consequences. The privilege should not be given or taken lightly.

·      Driving is not free. We needed a clear understanding between us of what costs we planned to cover and what costs he was expected to cover.

·      A vehicle requires maintenance. We wanted him to understand what our expectations were regarding maintaining his vehicle.

·      Allowing another to ride in your vehicle involves assumption of liability for that passenger’s safety.

·      The signing of the contract ceremonially hands over the keys. It emphasizes the seriousness of the new endeavor.

·      It has become a fun family tradition for us to take our new driver out for dinner and sign it with him. (Have the ceremony a few days before the driver’s test. Once they get that license it will be hard to keep their attention.)

The contract provided by the insurance company was a start for the contract we wrote. Their contract did not completely cover every point we wanted to emphasize and some of their contract was not relevant to our family.

 

This is the Teen Driving contract we wrote:

Teen Driving Contract

Between ___(mom)___, _____(Dad)___ and ___(teen)__

 Understand that it is only because we love you and are concerned for your safety and the safety of others that we ask you to enter into this agreement with us. We are extremely proud of you and are excited for you as you take on this very adult responsibility.

I, ___(teen)________, promise to NEVER:

·      Text while driving. Ever.

·      Drive without wearing my seatbelt and I will require all my passengers to wear theirs.

·      Ride in a vehicle where the driver has consumed alcohol or illegal substances or prescription drugs that are not theirs.

·      Use my cell phone for any purpose while driving. If I need to make a call, I will pull over. I will not answer my cell phone while driving.

·      Engage in distracting behaviors, like eating, grooming, or adjusting the radio/cell phone music while driving.

·      Drive with more passengers than allowed by law.

·      Drive someone else’s vehicle or allow someone to drive mine unless it is an absolute emergency. (If possible at all, call Mom or Dad first.)

 I, ___(teen)_________, promise to:

·      Abide by all traffic laws and signs.

·      Check and adjust my seat, rearview, and side mirrors before driving.

·      Take proper care of my vehicle, which includes:

            Maintaining a least a quarter tank of gas at all times.

            Changing the oil at the proper intervals.

            Notifying Mom or Dad immediately if any warning lights appear.

            Keeping the vehicle clean inside and out.

·      Accept the adult consequences for any mistakes I may make while driving. Adult responsibilities come with adult consequences. Excuses will not change the consequences. All traffic tickets or damages caused by me to any vehicle I am driving and damages to any property belonging to someone else is my sole responsibility. This responsibility includes any increase in insurance costs caused by a mistake on my part. 

·      Be willing to (and with a good attitude) help my family by driving __(siblings)__ to activities or running errands for my family when asked.

 Temporary restrictions (Mom and Dad will sign off on these when they feel they are no longer necessary.)

·      I will text Mom or Dad my location and driving intentions. Mom and Dad need to know where I am and my vehicle are at all times. (e.g. Text when I arrive at and leave school, text when I leave one location and go to another.)

·      I will not enter any highway system without specific permission from Mom or Dad. (A highway is any road with on/off ramps, speeds limits over 50 mph, no stoplights, etc.)

 I, ______(teen)__________, understand that the consumption or use of alcohol, illegal substances, tobacco, or prescription drugs that are not prescribed for me will result in the immediate revocation of my driving privileges, as well as other consequences that are deemed necessary. I, __________(teen)_____, also understand that driving is a privilege and that none of the cars owned by our family fully belongs to me. This contract is not to be considered an exhaustive list of every responsibility and may be updated or amended as necessary.

 

We, ___(Mom and Dad)_____, agree to allow ________(teen)_________ to have the privilege of driving under the agreement stated in this contract!

 

Signed and dated,

 ________________________________________________________                              _________________________

 ________________________________________________________                              _________________________

________________________________________________________                               _________________________

 

What do you think? Do Parents Need a Driving Contract With Their Teens? Do you have or plan to have a teen driving contract?

The Teen Driving Contract is available in the Almost Empty Nest Printables Library. Join below to access the Teen Driving Contract and all of the other printables featured in Almost Empty Nest blog posts.

 

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How to Teach Teens about Money

How to Teach Teens about Money

How to Teach Teens about Money

 

 

We all pray that one day our children will become not only financially responsible, but also financially independent. As we search for How to Teach Teens about Money, we have to remember that our children have already absorbed quite a bit about money whether that was our intention or not. Whether you have actively taught your kids financial lessons or have just let them watch you, they have a few things figured out.

How to Teach Teens About Money

 

By the time they turn 13, they have figured out where they rank in the socio-economic picture of the environment in which they live. They have figured out if they have more or less stuff or go on more or fewer vacations than their friends. They have watched you pay for things with cash, checks, or plastic cards. They have watched you withdraw cash from an ATM. They may have been told “we can't afford that” or they may  have never those words. They have also probably listened to financial discussions between their parents. Whether they had an allowance and were responsible for some expenses or mom and dad paid for everything, they already have some ideas about money and how to handle it. No matter what you have told or will tell your children about money, the number one thing they will learn about money is how you handle it.

The big change from elementary school money management to teen year money management are the times mom and dad are not around and they need money. How they get that money is something every family should spend some time thinking about. Are you going to hand them money every time they walk out the door or are you going to give them an allowance and expect them to cover some of their expenses? Will they have to earn their allowance? What items should they pay for? What do they need to know now, so that when they leave home, they can manage their money? The following steps are meant to help you as you think through these questions.

 

  • Even if your children are not yet teens, open a savings account for them and give them some allowance.

    Giving children an allowance in their elementary years begins their education in saving, giving, and making purchasing decisions. It amazed me how many times I saw my children decide against an item after I told them, “Yes, you may have it, but you will have to pay for it.” We gave a fixed allowance to our children. If they wanted extra money, they could earn it by doing jobs like yard work. We let them determine their own rate of savings and giving.

 

  • Discuss with your teens and tweens how they are going to acquire a car.

    A car is most likely the first major purchase a teen will face. We required our kids to contribute to their car purchase. Knowing this years in advance gave them plenty of incentive to work for extra money and to save. My husband took them to used car lots and showed them cars online so they would know how much money they would need to purchase what they wanted. If they previously thought they would be happy with the car they could buy with mom and dad's contribution, a trip to see actual cars showed them they needed to save for something more.

 

  • Talk to your teens and younger children about how you manage your money.

    They don't need to know every gritty detail of your finances, but discuss your overall financial values and strategies with them. If something might confuse them, make sure they understand why you are doing things a particular way. For example: I almost always pay with credit cards. I do this because I want the airline miles, it is convenient, and it is safer than cash. (I know someone whose purse was stolen with her cash envelopes for the month inside.) However, I have told my children one million times that I ALWAYS pay the balance due IN FULL EVERY SINGLE MONTH. Whatever your financial situation and the story behind it, share it with them.

 

  • Prepaid Debit Cards are great for learning.

    I am not big on carrying lots of cash. As the kids transitioned to having more responsibility for expenses (in their tween years), we gave them prepaid debit cards. Each month, they told me how much of their allowance money to load on the card, how much they wanted in cash, and how much to put in savings. It was complicated with three children, but we made it through those years by insisting they keep track of their own “extra money” hours, writing everything down on a log sheet I provided, and turning it all in to me once a month.

 

  • Transition them to a checking account with a debit/ATM card.

    After they had the basics down, we put their allowance straight into their savings accounts. They were then responsible for transferring spending money into checking and going to the ATM if they needed cash.

 

  • Decide what expenses they should pay for with their allowance.

    This decision is personal and each family has to make their own decisions. Our kids have been responsible for gas, birthday gifts for their friends (this is a biggie as sometimes there are several birthday celebrations every month), meals out on their own, and entertainment. We provide for their “needs” as determined by us. Our daughter sometimes buys extra clothes. Our sons would wear ratty shorts and a t-shirt on a 15 degree day rather than buy their own clothes. We also have a driving contract with our kids. If they follow their part of the contract, we pay for insurance and maintenance of their vehicles.

 

  • Encourage (coerce) them to get a job.

    We have enough yard work at our house to keep our kids busy and in money in their younger teen years, but later we like for them to learn to work for someone else. Our oldest (now in college) was blessed with a very flexible job with four hour shifts, which enabled him to work even during the school year. Our middle son has been an entrepreneur transferring people's VHS recordings to video, shooting and editing events, working as a camera man for his school's football stadium “jumbotron,” and other odd jobs. Our youngest is still on the yard work detail, but is excited to get a job that does not involve our tractor.

 

  • What is the plan for college?

    Discuss with your teen as you begin the college search how much you will be able to contribute to their education. This number will not necessarily help you rule in and out schools at the outset because the “sticker price” at most schools is not the final price. But make sure that your student applies to at least one “safe” school that the family can afford if scholarships and financial aid do not work out.

 

  • Set a spending money budget for college.

    This can be a difficult allowance to determine. When our oldest went to college, we made our best guesstimate of what he would need for gas, groceries, personal items, meals out, and entertainment. At the end of the first semester, we re-evaluated and upped his allowance a bit. Another hurdle is the college meal plan. Almost every college will require freshmen students to purchase a meal plan. Many require them to live on campus and purchase one of the pricier plans. My post “The Real Cost of a College Meal Plan” will help you decide on a plan and then budget for meals not eaten at the school.

 

The teen years can be a challenging time for many families financially. Teen activities are often expensive. Teens want freedom to go out to eat and buy entertainment. They want a car, fashionable clothing, and a smart phone. College is looming. Every family will have many decisions to make and there is no one right way to teach teens about money, but the end goal is the same: rearing financially responsible and independent children.

There are many resources available for managing money. I have listed some below.

  • Apps (too many to list) that help you track your spending.
  • Your bank app (Ours lets us easily transfer money to and from our kids accounts.)
  • Square Cash app is a free app that also allows you to transfer money.
  • Homey is a free app (with in-app purchases) that assigns chores to family members and keeps track of allowance or other rewards earned.
  • Do your kids need a reality check? Go to Jumpstart and complete the reality check exercise. It will tell them how much money they need to earn for their desired spending.
  • The mint has lessons and information for about financial responsibility for kids, teens, and parents.
  • Personal finance books.

 

Another great post about teens and money from my friend Holly at Phase2Parenting:  Teaching Children about Savings and Credit

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Adulting: 7 Expenses to Consider When You Enter the Real World

Adulting: 7 Expenses to Consider When You Enter the Real World

Adulting: 7 Expenses to Consider When You Enter the Real World

 

This is a guest post by Melanie Studer of Parenting High Schoolers

 

Many of our friends have kids who have graduated from college and are starting life out in the real world. It is such an exciting time!  I remember my first year away from home, and the beginning of adulting on my own. There are so many unexpected costs in the real world, but most boil down to finances when you think about it.  Here are 7 Expenses to Consider When You Enter the Real World to discuss with your young adult as they move toward independence.

Adulting: 7 Expenses to Consider When You Enter the Real World

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 Rent:  

Your young adult may need to put a deposit down on an apartment for the first time themselves. It is usually something like the first and last months’ rent, all at once.  This can be a huge expense, and might be an amount to borrow from parents with the understanding that either it will be paid back, or maybe it will be a gift from them for the exiting of their financial care.  

One huge decision is whether or not to have a roommate.  Having a roommate (or 2 or 3), will really help with the cost of rent as well as utilities and food, etc.  Your young adult needs to understand that rent needs to be paid by a certain date each month.  

Be sure that they know to ALWAYS pay their rent on time because there will be a penalty or fee if the deadline is missed.

 Utilities:  

This is another deposit situation.  It is usually a set amount to cover the utilities being turned on in your young adult's name at a new address.  Parents may need to be paid back for this as well.  

There are many ways to manage this monthly cost.  One way is to unplug anything that's not currently being used.  Even if something is unplugged, it will still pull amps–this costs money!  Also, watch the length of showers, hot water is not free! These seemingly minor adjustments can make a big difference.  

Keep track.  Look at the bill for one month of not paying any attention to doing either of these things. Then, have them make a conscience effort to do just these two things.  Look at the bill again. Is there a difference? There was for our family.  

Another thing to consider is budget billing.  Once your young adult has lived somewhere for a year, they can contact the utility company and set it up as a monthly budgeted amount for the following year. If less is used after this, the utility company will readjust the following year at a smaller amount–and credit any extra amount accumulated.  If more is used, they will adjust the amount upwards.

Remind them that all bills must be paid on time.  A life lesson would be to show them how to set up a scheduled payment from their bank account.

 Home Decor:  

This is an area that your young adult can get creative with on any budget.  A lot of furniture can be obtained from relatives or picked up at second hand stores and garage sales.  It’s the little things that make a house/apartment a home though.  

So, if your young adult is crafty and likes to DIY, they can sort through items at craft fairs and flea markets. There are many uses for a can of paint, washi tape, fabric and other fairly inexpensive items that will brighten up their apartment.  They can look on Pinterest for decorating ideas.  

 Kitchen Supplies:  

You never know how expensive things are until they are needed.  Kitchen gadgets are expensive, even things like trash cans! Parents if you are wanting to upgrade any of your kitchen tools, give them to your kids, that way they can get theirs for free!  

Look on Ebay, Craigslist, and garage sales for the gadgets.  They can ask for these things at Christmas or birthdays. If your young adult is truly on their own, they can just purchase these items one at a time.  

 Renter’s Insurance:  

Your young adult should really consider getting this.  Renters insurance is personal property coverage, and may help cover the cost of replacing their things if the items are unexpectedly damaged or ruined.  It can apply to certain risks or (perils) such as fire or theft. Some landlords require it. 

It is also good to have if they have a rental unit for furniture etc.  Insurance will cover many circumstances and is worth paying for.

 Wifi:  

Yes, they will have to pay for this when not living at their parents house or a dorm.

 Groceries:  

Stocking up on groceries when your young adult is first starting out is a challenge.  Items such as sugar and other baking goods can get expensive. Paper goods don’t last forever and have to be replaced.  Eating healthy can get expensive too.  

I encourage them to try the Dollar Store for paper goods and even canned items, and sometimes, the items in their freezer section are good too.  Aldi’s is a great option for everything else! I have found that they have the best prices, even usually beating Walmart most of the time.  

Freezing their own food is a good option as well-many things can be frozen! 

 

These are just  7 Expenses to Consider When You Enter the Real World.  I encourage you to help them set up a budget and try to stick to it. Help them to readjust after a couple of months to see what needs to be changed. 

 

Good luck!

What are any other unexpected expenses?  Have you found some good ways to help your young adult to deal with them? Please share!

 

Melanie has a BS in Education with more than two decades of parenting and classroom experience. She has worked with students preschool through high school. Her oldest two sons are in college now.

She is passionate about helping families to know their options and keeping the lines of parent/child communication open. She encourages students to expand their world through service, leadership and volunteering–”a well-rounded student makes a better citizen.”

Melanie is a wife and mom to three boys and two dogs. She is a lover of reading, teaching, and writing. She blogs for parents of teens at www.parentinghighschoolers.com.

You can follow her on Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram.

She has also written a book, College Bound: The Ultimate List of Conversations to Help Your Teen Through High School. 

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12 Bible Verses for College Students

12 Bible Verses for College Students

12 Bible Verses for College Students

 

Sending a child off to college is a monumental step for both parent and student. These 12 Bible Verses for College Students will encourage your student during the days of struggle, fear, loneliness, and moral turmoil that are ahead. They will also help them remember to shout for joy at their hard earned successes and to know that every good and perfect gift is from above.

I created printables of the 12 Bible Verses for College Students listed below for you to tuck into a care package or print out for their bulletin boards. They are available for you to print in the Subscriber's Library. You may gain access to the library by subscribing below. The library contains not only the Bible verse printables, but also all of the other printables featured in posts on Almost Empty Nest.

More Good Bible Verses for College Students:

Bible Verses for High School Graduation

Bible Verses for Parents of College Students

 

12 Good Bible Verses for College Students

 

Isaiah 40:30-31 – Even youths grow tired and weary, and young men stumble and fall; but those who hope in the LORD will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint.

 

Psalm 19:14 – May these words of my mouth and this meditation of my heart be pleasing in your sight, LORD, my Rock and my Redeemer.

 

1 Peter 5:7 – Cast all of your anxiety on him because he cares for you.

 

Colossians 2:6-7 – So then, just as you received Christ Jesus as Lord, continue to live your lives in him, rooted and built up in him, strengthened in the faith as you were taught, and overflowing with thankfulness.

 

Isaiah 41:10 – So do not fear, for I am your God. I will strengthen you and help you; I will uphold you with my righteous right hand.

 

Jeremiah 29:11 – “For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the LORD, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.”

 

Philippians 4:6-7 – Do not be anxious about anything, but in every situation, by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving, present your requests to God. And the peace of God, which transends all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

 

2 Timothy 1:7 – For the Spirit God gave us does not make us timid, but gives us power, love, and self-discipline.

 

John 16:33 – In this world you will have trouble. But take heart! I have overcome the world.

 

Psalm 145:18 – The LORD is near to all who call on him, to all who call on him in truth.

 

Romans 8:31 – What, then, shall we say in response to these things? If God is for us, who can be against us?

 

Philippians 4:8 – Whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable – if anything is excellent or praiseworthy – think about such things.

[bctt tweet=”12 Good Bible Verses for College Students to encourage them whether they are stressed, tired, lonely, or want to jump for joy!” username=”Lauradennis_AEN”]

College is full of ups and downs. These 12 Bible Verses for College Students will encourage them to lean on the Lord during times of joy and trial. These printable verses are available in the Subscriber's Library. Sign up below!!

 

These printable verses would be a great addition to your next care package! For LOTS of CARE PACKAGE IDEAS:

Care Package Ideas

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crockpot meals for two
The Best Back to School Tips for Teens and Parents

The Best Back to School Tips for Teens and Parents

PLANNING FOR COLLEGE CHECKLISTS

Get your FREE copy of the Planning for College Checklists – Junior Year, Summer Before Senior Year, Senior Year, FAFSA, CSS-Profile, Scholarships, Dorm Shopping, Packing for the Move, and the Parent Survival Kit for College Drop Off

The Best Back to School Tips for Teens and Parents

 

Can you believe it is already time to get ready to go Back to School? Going back to school for teens is a whole different ballgame than going back as an elementary student. Their activities are more intense and they cost more. Many teens begin practice for fall sports and fine arts at the beginning of August. Their clothes are extremely important to them and they are not cheap either. If they are headed into their junior year of high school, it is time to get serious about what they are going to do after high school, especially if they are college-bound. To help you as you prepare for the new school year, I have gotten together with some of my fellow bloggers and prepared the Best Back to School Tips for Teens and Parents. 

 

The Best Back to School Tips for Teens and Parents

 

The best teen and college parent bloggers around have written posts to help you get organized, get school supplies, and start preparing those high school kids for college.

 

Teens and parents have more than just high school on their minds. They also have to plan for their futures after high school. Miranda of The Reluctant Cowgirl has an awesome post with 3 Tips to Motivating Teens to Apply for College and for Scholarships

But before they can apply for college they need to do their homework!! Dana E. Baker of Parenting in Real Life writes about Homework Hell? 10 Tips to Sanity.

Dana also shares her Mom Tips for Surviving the High School Senior Year.

Speaking of that senior year…. There are many costs associated with having a senior. Check out my post High School Senior Year Costs with suggestions for both high and low options for paying for the year.

Going back to school can be super stressful for both teens and their parents. Nancy from Raising Teens Today gives 5 Tips to Conquer Back to School Stress.

Louisa, a teacher, tutor, mom, and owner of LPTutoring knows what school supplies are really needed and how to get good deals on them. She shares Back to School Shopping for Teens.

Melanie of Parenting High Schoolers knows that navigating high school with your child can be like riding a roller coaster. They have a FREE Parent Survival Kit just for the high school moms. Check out their High School Survival Kit for Parents.

Ready to get help your teen get organized? Here are 5 Amazing Organizational Apps for Teens from Kira of Parenting Teens and Tweens.

Kira is an overachiever and also writes Sunshine and Hurricanes with her friend Michelle. They know that the high school homework of today is above most of our pay grades, so they have found The Best Homework Apps to Help Your Child Succeed.

One of the challenges of high school is that college is not far behind. Monica of How2winscholarships knows that the sooner you begin applying for scholarships, the more your child will win. Read her tips in How to Start the College Scholarship Process.

 

Blessings to you all as you begin getting ready for your teens to go back to school!

FREE PRINTABLE DORM SHOPPING CHECKLIST

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Parent Survival Kit for College Drop-Off

Parent Survival Kit for College Drop-Off

FREE PRINTABLE DORM SHOPPING CHECKLIST

The Dorm Shopping Checklist is TOTALLY FREE for members of the Almost Empty Nest Community!

The Dorm Shopping Checklist is part of the Almost Empty Nest Printables Library. Gain access by becoming an Almost Empty Nest Member. If you prefer not to be a member, you may purchase the printables through the same link below.

Parent Survival Kit for College Move In

 

You have known this day was coming for several months. You have shopped for all the dorm necessities on the College Dorm Room Check List, have them packed up (How to Move to the U), and everything is in the front hall ready to go in the car. But, what else do you need to ensure a smooth move-in day? There are a few “don't forget” items you need to include in your Parent Survival Kit for College Move In.

Also Check Out:

College Dorm Room Checklist

 

Parent Survival Kit for College Move In

This post may contain affiliate links, meaning if you click on a link and make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no additional charge to you. See footbar for my complete disclosure.

 

 

Whether you are approaching college drop-off with dread or excitement or a combination of both, you want the day to go as smoothly as possible. There is the potential for crowded hallways and staircases (forget the elevator), no or very little air conditioning, and a high emotional level from every person you bump into in these crowded hallways. Being prepared will keep you from bursting into tears as soon as you walk into your child's very small room that is already full of her roommate's stuff and her roommate's five family members.

 

 

Follow these steps and you will be smiling at least most of the day:

The first step to being prepared is to follow the instructions from the school. Plan to arrive at the time you have been assigned. Don't try to beat the system. They have assigned the times for a reason and they will not want to check you in early. If you manage to beat the system and get moved in early, it will cause resentment from your child's roommate who arrives to find the room already set up without his input.

Bring your Parent Survival Kit for College Move In

Items to include in your Parent Survival Kit for College Move In:

A dollie or wagon. Hopefully, happy and enthusiastic upper classmen will meet you at the curb and take everything to the room for you. If this does not happen, you will be prepared to stack things in your wagon and make quick work of moving the stuff to the room.

We bought this wagon for our daughter's track meets. It was awesome! It folds up flat, has drink holders, and all-terrain wheels. We will definitely take it to her college move in this fall!!

A wheeled ice chest with some cold drinks and snacks.

A door stop to prop the dorm door open while moving in or to keep the room from being too stuffy.

A few tools (electric screwdriver/drill, rubber mallet, hammer) for assembling shelves and drawer units.

Pen and Paper to make a list of items to go buy once you arrive.

Tape Measure. If you need to go buy shelves or drawer units, it will help to know the space available.

Alcohol Swabs and a blow dryer: These items will be on my list for the first time on the advice of a parent's Facebook group. Why? To hang Command Strips. We plan to hang some curtains with Command Hooks. I am reading that in order to get the strips to hang and stay hung that we need to make sure we clean the wall and get it dry before applying the strips. 

Kleenex (a few for your pocket and a box for the car).

Multi-purpose cleaner and paper towels to clean spots in the room or furniture that were missed by the last occupant.

 

 

 

A Few More College Move In Tips:

Expect chaos and be ready to be patient and malleable to the situation.

Don't plan to give advice to your child about room setup or anything else. This is not the time. It is their room and they need the freedom to decide where the bed goes, what drawer they want their underwear in, and whether they want you to unpack everything.

Take pictures of any existing damage to walls, floors, doors, and furniture in case it is an issue at move-out.

Plan a shopping trip. After you arrive and get the basic unpacking done, take a survey of the room and make a list of items to go buy. These may be items that were too big to bring with you or just some snacks and laundry detergent. A shopping trip gets you out of the dorm for a while and lets you and your child pick out a few last things together.

Find a place other than the dorm for your good-byes – some place calmer and more private. Take your child out to dinner or for ice cream as your last activity and say good bye there.

While it may be hard to believe, you both will survive the drop-off experience. Planning ahead and bringing a Parent Survival Kit for College Move Inn will certainly help. You cannot anticipate everything the day will entail, but having a few items at your fingertips will keep the panic at bay. When it is time to get in the car and drive away, smile through the tears and congratulate yourself on raising a spectacular kid who is ready for the adventures and experiences ahead.

 

 

 

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